"Mr. Tuck had my son thinking all day about what he heard in school. He told me later that night about his one piece of bread in the morning and night. I am thankful for the hand out that was brought home, so I can read his story. This has been a priceless experience for my son, and I am so thankful that Mr. Tuck was able to visit. ~ A Perkiomen Valley HS parent

Archive

March 13th, 2017

Museum Closed Tuesday, March 14th

Due to the inclement weather, we will be closed on Tuesday, March 14th.

February 27th

Hate Never Takes a Vacation

We denounce the latest spates of hatred directed at Jewish cemeteries, community centers, and schools. We are appalled by this hatred. Most of us at HAMEC, unfortunately, are not surprised. As our facilitators explain to the thousands of students we meet, we are all minorities. If the haters come for one group first, then they will come for another group next. The good news is that these despicable acts have gotten the attention of the media. Many individuals and organizations have risen to the occasion by raising both dollars for needed repairs and awareness of the problem. Cherished headstones of beloved family members can and will be replaced. We join in the growing chorus in opposition to the deeds of haters. We also will double down on our efforts to prevent additional young people from becoming haters.

How? By simply doing more of what we already do. During this school year we will, once again, complete hundreds of Holocaust survivor programs at schools throughout the five county area. And, as many of you are aware we have begun skyping our heroes to students around the country and the world. Georgia, Arkansas, Wisconsin, Alaska, Texas, California and Kansas are just some of the states we have reached in the last month. We have also skyped to Italy, the Bahamas, England and Australia. We're fielding requests from China, the Ukraine, India, Brazil, Israel, Indonesia and (just today!) from Saudi Arabia. In fewer than 30 days we've completed more than 35 programs reaching more than 2,500 students. Most of these young people have never heard or seen a Holocaust survivor let alone had the opportunity to speak with one of them.

We request that you channel your justifiable anger and concerns and help us with our important mission. How? Contact friends and family around the country and the world to tell them about what we're doing. One of our Skype programs is only a few phone calls or e-mails away from being scheduled. Or consider making a donation to keep our educational programs growing and flourishing in this time of need.

Thank you,
Chuck Feldman
President
Holocaust Awareness Museum and Education Center

February 22nd

Miriam Krugman Caine (1933-2017)

Miriam (nee Krugman) Caine passed away on Sunday, February 21st, after dedicating many years to teaching children and adults about her Holocaust experiences at the hands of the Nazis and then under Soviet occupation.

Miriam was seven years old when the Nazis arrived in Bialystok, Poland. Due to the Non-Aggression Pact between Germany and the Soviet Union, Bialystok was turned over to the Soviet Union in September 1939. In July 1941 she, her family, and others were packed into trains andspent two days traveling without food or water to a labor camp in Siberia. There they suffered continuously from hunger and cold.

Miriam was twelve years old when the war ended in 1945. She and her family made their way to the western part of Germany and lived in a Displaced Persons camp. In 1949 her family moved to Philadelphia where she later met and married Allen Caine, another survivor. He had survived Auschwitz. They had two children and two grandchildren.

For many decades, Miriam served tirelessly as a leader in the Philadelphia community and was passionate about speaking to students about her experiences, providing them insights into the effects of hatred and anti-Semitism. May her life serve as an example for others and a blessing for all of us.

Read her bull bio here